A.Yoo

"He satisfies the longing soul." - Psalm 107:9

Yes, there are many things that are wrong with the world. So many things to be against — but you can’t be against everything. At some point you have to begin to stand for something. Maybe the most important question is not what am I against, but what do I stand for? On my best days, I want to stand for love conquering a multitude of wrongs. I want to stand for forgiveness, for mercy, for beauty, for grace. Jon Foreman (via hellohurricane)

(via marcphun)

5 days ago

Most people do not listen
with the intent
to understand;

they listen
with the intent
to reply.
Stephen Covey (via vvolare)

(via han-nara)

5 days ago

everysongaday:

HUMMING URBAN STEREO (허밍 어반 스테레오) - Lotus

5 days ago

Confidence isn’t walking into a room with your nose in the air, and thinking you are better than everyone else, it’s walking into a room and not having to compare yourself to anyone else in the first place. (via yesdarlingido)

(Source: coffeeandcountry, via yesdarlingido)

6 days ago

Sometimes I remind myself that I almost skipped the party, that I almost went to a different college, that the whim of a minute could have changed everything and everyone. Our lives, so settled, so specific, are built on happenstance. Anna Quindlen, Every Last One   (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: wordsthat-speak, via awelltraveledwoman)

6 days ago

http://hyeminlee.tumblr.com/post/94963653436

What Hartshorne and May concluded, then, is that something like honesty isn’t a fundamental trait, or what they called a “unified” trait. A trait like honesty, they concluded, is considerably influenced by the situation. 

All of us, when it comes to personality, naturally think in terms of absolutes: that a person is a certain way or is not a certain way. But what Zimbardo and Hartshorne and May are suggesting is that this is a mistake, that when we think only in terms of inherent traits and forget the role of situations, we’re deceiving ourselves about the real causes of human behavior. 

Character, then, isn’t what we think it is or, rather, what we want it to be. It isn’t a stable, easily identifiable set of closely related traits, and it only seems that way because of a glitch in the way our brains are organized. Character is more like a bundle of habits and tendencies and interests, loosely bound together and dependent, at certain times, on circumstances and context. The reason that most of us seem to have a consistent character is that most of us are really good at controlling our environment. I have a lot of fun at dinner parties. As a result, I throw a lot of dinner parties and my friends see me there and think that I’m fun. But if I couldn’t have a lot of dinner parties, if my friends instead tended to see me in lots of different situations over which I had little or no control- like, say, faced with four hostile youths in a filthy, broken-down subway- they probably wouldn’t think of me as fun anymore.